Euthanasia is most often accomplished for pets by injection of a death-inducing drug. A tranquilizer may be given first to relax your pet. Following injection of the euthanasia drug, your pet will immediately become deeply and irreversibly unconscious as the drug stops brain function. Death is quick and painless. Your pet may move its legs or head or breathe deeply several times after the drug is given, but these are reflexes and don’t mean that your pet is in pain or is suffering. 


An appointment can be made at our hospital or in the comforts of your pet's home. Options of home-burial and cremation services are available. Please call our veterinary team should you like to schedule a house-call and/or discuss cremation options as well.

If your pet can no longer experience the things it once enjoyed, cannot respond to you in its usual ways, or appears to be experiencing more pain than pleasure, you may need to consider euthanasia. Likewise, if your pet is terminally ill or critically injured, or if the financial or emotional cost of treatment is beyond your means, euthanasia may be a valid option. Sometimes asking yourself the question, “Does my pet have more bad days than good days?” can help you make the decision.

As your veterinarian, we understand your bond with your pet and can examine and evaluate your pet’s condition, estimate its chances for recovery, and discuss any potential disabilities, special needs and long-term problems.  Because as your veterinarian, we cannot make the euthanasia decision for you, it is important that you fully understand your pet’s condition. If there is any part of the diagnosis or the possible effects on your pet’s future that you don’t understand, ask questions that will help you understand. Although there are times when the decision needs to be made immediately, you usually will have some time to review the facts and discuss it with your family and friends before making the decision. 

It’s never an easy decision to make, but perhaps the kindest thing you can do for a pet that is extremely ill or so severely injured that it will never be able to resume a life of good quality is to have your veterinarian induce its death quietly and humanely through euthanasia.

A decision concerning euthanasia may be one of the most difficult decisions you will ever make for your pet. Although it is a personal decision, it doesn’t need to be a solitary one. Your veterinarian and your family and close friends can help you make the right decision and can support you as you grieve the loss of your pet.