Talk to our veterinary team about microchipping. Until the end of February, 2016, we are offering a $5 discount on microchipping.

Once your pet is microchipped, there are only three things you need to do:


1) make sure the microchip is registered;

2) ask your veterinarian to scan your pet's microchip at least once per year to make sure the microchip is still functioning and can be detected; and

3) keep your registration information up-to-date.

If you've moved, or if any of your information (especially your phone number) has changed, make sure you update your microchip registration in the manufacturer's database as soon as possible.

August 15 is "Check the Chip Day." 


Orcas Veterinary Service is proud to have reunited pets to their owners... all thanks to a microchip.


A microchip is a small, electronic chip enclosed in a glass cylinder that is about the same size as a grain of rice. The microchip itself does not have a battery—it is activated by a scanner that is passed over the area, and the radiowaves put out by the scanner activate the chip. The chip transmits the identification number to the scanner, which displays the number on the screen. The microchip itself is also called a transponder.


The microchips presently used in pets only contain identification numbers.The microchip is not a GPS device and cannot track your animal if it gets lost. Although the present technology microchip itself does not contain your pet's medical information, some microchip registration databases will allow you to store that information in the database for quick reference.





Microchipping